Paasmer Developement Status

Paasmer Development Status – December 2017

ManagementTeamMouli1

Srinidhi Murthy

Hello everyone, we at Paasmer are continuously striving towards making your life as an IoT Developer or Organization or Institution easier. In this blog, we talk about some of the key new features that we have made available on the Paasmer Platform. They are listed below.

Paasmer 2.x Python, Java and C SDK

We have added an auto-download script to download the credentials and the configuration file of the device based on device creation and configurations done on the Paasmer IoT platform Dashboard. We have also added support for BT and Zigbee protocols for the above SDK’s.

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Paasmer CoAP V-1

Bringing the web to constrained IoT devices that lack the capabilities of computers or smartphones requires a special sort of IoT protocol, and CoAP is one such protocol that fits that bill. The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standardized the Constrained Application Protocol or CoAP as RFC 7252 in 2014, essentially as HTTP designed specifically for constrained devices.

Constrained Application Protocol or CoAP is a service layer protocol that is intended for use in resource-constrained internet devices, such as wireless sensor network nodes. CoAP is designed to easily translate to HTTP for simplified integration with the web, while also meeting specialized requirements such as multicast support, very low overhead, and simplicity.

The Constrained Application Protocol was necessary because traditional protocols are considered “too heavy” for IoT applications involving constrained devices. CoAP is a software protocol that enables simple constrained “things” such as low-power sensors and actuators to communicate interactively via the internet. It runs on devices that support the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) and implements a “lightweight” application layer that features small message sizes, message management and lightweight message overhead ideally suited for low-power, low-memory devices.

The IoT realm is widely using CoAP as a protocol for home automation and in numerous industrial applications. The Open Connectivity Foundation and ZigBee are tapping CoAP as a core protocol for their frameworks and product implementations. To keep pace with the Cambrian-like explosion of growth of connected “things” ahead, an IoT protocol designed specifically for constrained devices, such as CoAP, has a critical role to play.

Paasmer IoT Platform always adopts the latest and most cutting-edge technology, drafts and protocols and adding CoAP support was a natural progression. The Paasmer CoAP V-1 is an SDK with ESP8266 Arduino libraries and Gateway Server for SBC’s. The Paasmer CoAP V-1 is a collection of source files that enables you to connect to the Paasmer IoT Platform and uses CoAP a service layer protocol.

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Paasmer CoAP V-1 SDK is designed for the Gateway and the End-device / Sensor-node and has two separate components.

Paasmer CoAP Gateway establishes communication between the End-devices and Paasmer IoT platform. It will connect and control the End-devices / Sensor-nodes and update the status to the Paasmer IoT platform.

Paasmer CoAP End-Device communicates to the Paasmer Gateway and Control GPIO Pins based on Gateway instructions.

The Readme file for the Paasmer CoAP V-1 is available here which talks about the Pre-requisites, installation, and setup in detail.

Paasmer 3.0 Preview

Paasmer 3.0 makes life easy for IoT Developers, Institutions and Organizations to deploy, update, and maintain code running on field devices. We aim to bring development and deployment workflow to hardware, using well-known tools like git, Docker, and simple toolchains to allow you to seamlessly update all your embedded IoT devices anywhere in the world. We handle all the nitty-gritty stuff so that you can concentrate on your IoT solutions and nothing more.

Paasmer 3.0

The Paasmer 3.0  would encompass the following features.

  • Control and Monitor Field Devices.
    • Reach your devices anywhere.
    • Choose your own flavour of OS.
    • Take control of networking.
    • Heartbeat and Status monitoring.
  • Provision devices with simple Wizards.
    • UUID for each device.
    • Zero Config support.
    • Add preconfigured credentials.
  • Manage many … many devices all at once.
    • Set environment variables for your devices.
    • Access devices via Web address.
  • Security built from the ground up.
    • All communication between Paasmer and Field devices is encrypted with rotating keys.
    • Continuous Updates.
    • Latest web-based authentication like OAuth 2 and OTP for dashboards.

The Paasmer 3.0  would be released in parts, starting with the Edge Docker. The Paasmer Edge Docker Version 1, which is built for Raspberry-pi running Paasmer OS is a collection of Docker containers that enables you to do analytics on edge and to connect to the Paasmer IoT Platform. This Paasmer Edge Docker Version 1 is equipped with Zigbee support along with Board GPIO’s. This is the first step in building the Paasmer 3.0.

The Paasmer Edge Docker Version 1 consists of two key submodules

Paasmer OS is an attempt to make container-based services available for embedded IoT devices. Currently, we support the Raspberry-Pi. Support for other devices coming soon.

Paasmer Edge Analytics is the key feature in Paasmer-Docker which provides you to do analytics on the sensor data. Presently we are providing filter algorithm, where you can filter your sensor data based on your filter condition. Support for More algorithms on analytics coming soon.

The Readme file for the Paasmer Edge Docker Version 1 is available here which talks about the Pre-requisites, installation, and setup in detail.

 

iot2

Naturalizing IOT through standardization

ManagementTeamMouli1

Kavitha Gopalan

Internet of Things is one of fast growing technology in the recent years. It’s expected that the growth of connected things will be around 50 billion by 2020. Every industry vertical has signed itself into embracing IOT either to create cutting edge products or for optimizing the resource and improve efficiency. As IOT growth explodes there are few challenges that are becoming key road blocks for a wider adoption of IOT. The two of the challenges that stands out are the security and Standardization.

Like any new growing technology, standardization is important for IOT. Standardization will allow devices to interoperable in IOT and allow seamless integration between various verticals. Several attempts have been made to standardize IOT, new alliances and consortiums have been formed but there is yet no single winner though many have shown promises for becoming one.

Why is standardizing IOT difficult?

The main reason for the complexity of IOT standardization is the fragmented nature of its adoption base. IOT is a global phenomenon and it has expanded its roots to all sectors of life- Factories, Healthcare, transportation, utilities, home. The standards and protocol used for one vertical may not scale well for the other. For example, a smart home device may be managed with the wireless protocol such as Zigbee or WiFi. But when IOT is used for an M2M application Zigbee or WiFi may not be the right approach we need to look at cellular communication protocols.

Similarly, each layer of the IOT architecture could vary depending on which industry its used for. The way an industrial application handles data may be different from the way the home device handles it. So arriving at the common standard which is agreeable to all has been difficult.

Differences in IOT spring from each layer of the architecture. Each vendor/manufacturer use the approach which easily adaptable to their industry segment.

Where are we now?

Z-wave and Zigbee were the top standards used by several smart home manufacturers in the beginning. But they could not establish themselves as the defacto standard for IOT. Then we had many more communication protocols that emerged as the one that could serve the needs of IOT, there are around 12+ protocols now available for IOT, Bluetooth, Zigbee, Zwave, EnOcean, NFC, WiFI, LPWAN, NB-IOT, weightless, LoRA, LTE, Cellular being some of them.

The differences are just not in the communication layer.Different standards are available for data transport in IOT – MQTT, CoAP, REST, SOAP, Websocket.

Many consortium and alliance have been formed to standardize IOT. Some of the as listed below

  • The Open Interconnect Consortium has come out with their IOTvity standards
  • AllSeen Alliance has their ALLJoyn standard.
  • THread group has the thread standard.
  • ZigBee Alliance has their Zigbee standard.
  • Z Wave alliance.
  • Industrial Internet Consortium.

The goal of these consortiums is to find a common ground /standard that every vendor manufacturer can follow while implementing IOT. But unfortunately they haven’t been able to agree on the terms But currently, no one has emerged as the leader in setting the standards. Disagreement in standards, licensing has been the reason for no clear winner. Which standard will emerge as a leader will be based on which is easily adaptable by manufacturers.

Right now every vendor puts together the pieces that works best for their application without much thought on the standards. But if IOT has to mature a common standard must emerge which would allow Interoperability of various devices and can scale to different industry verticals seamlessly. Whether this is possible or not depends on how much collaboration happens between this different consortium.