IonBlock-Sdk-Paasmer

How to Use the IonBloc SDK

ManagementTeamMouli1

Srinidhi Murthy

What is Block Chain?

A blockchain – originally block chain – is a distributed database that is used to maintain a continuously growing list of records, called blocks. Each block contains a timestamp and a link to a previous block. A blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for validating new blocks. By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data. Once recorded, the data in any given block cannot be altered retroactively without the alteration of all subsequent blocks and a collusion of the network majority. Functionally, a blockchain can serve as “an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way. The ledger itself can also be programmed to trigger transactions automatically.”

Blockchains are secure by design and are an example of a distributed computing system with high Byzantine fault tolerance. Decentralized consensus has therefore been achieved with a blockchain. This makes blockchains potentially suitable for the recording of events, medical records, and other records management activities, such as identity management, transaction processing, and documenting provenance.

IonBloc

ionBlocIonBloc Data flow and usage

IonBloc is our version of Open source Ethereum Blockchain network that can be setup as a public production implementation or a private test implementation depending on client needs.

In an IoT network, the blockchain can keep an immutable record of the history of smart devices. This feature enables the autonomous functioning of smart devices without the need for centralized authority. Thus, blockchain opens the door to a series of IoT scenarios that were remarkably difficult, or even impossible to implement without it.

By leveraging blockchain, IoT solutions can enable secure, trust less messaging between devices in an IoT network. In this model, the blockchain will treat message exchanges between devices like financial transactions in a Bitcoin network. To enable message exchanges, devices will leverage smart contracts which then model the agreement between the two parties.

Using blockchain will enable true autonomous smart devices that can exchange data, or even execute financial transactions, without the need of a centralized broker. This type of autonomy is possible because the nodes in the blockchain network will verify the validity of the transaction without relying on a centralized authority.

Installation:

The IonBloc SDK allows for a seamless connection to our private Blockchain. Here’s how you can do it. You need to have a Raspberry PI 3 with a 16GB SD card and running the latest Raspbian OS. Also, you need to have a stable high speed Internet connection (500 kbps at a minimum)

  • Download the Zip file from Github or execute a git clone command on our repository.
  • Extract and Install the SDK using the Installation script.
  • Some of the necessary support libraries are installed and you are taken to a GETH console.

Once you are in the GETH console,

  • Create a new account. (Noted down the password)
  • Provide our Admin Enode address and Pair
  • That’s it you are connected to our private Block Chain.

Now the possibilities are endless, but to get you started we have given a sample code and procedure to create contracts to blink an LED connected to a GPIO pin on the R-PI.

You can create contracts which have more features, which can read sensors, turn on actuators, monitor sensors etc.
IonBloc SDK is just the starting point … the tip of the iceberg. Some of the more advanced use cases can be found in

IonBloc SDK is just the starting point … the tip of the iceberg. Some of the more advanced use cases can be found in

  • Industrial and manufacturing for improving monitoring and efficient “Just in Time” (JIT) processes.
  • Connected and Driverless vehicles where every vehicle becomes a node and there can be an efficient vehicle to vehicle communication.
  • Public infrastructure and smart cities: Smart devices are already being used to track the health of bridges, roads, power grids etc. Blockchains can be used to interconnect these to share efficiencies and to conduct maintenance, forecast usage trends for power usage, pollution etc.

We have given a limited set of features to create a working POC that can be later developed into fully fledged modules. There are many more features that can be added as a part of customization for specific requirements.
We can do a lot more with IonBloc (some of the features are present in the data flow diagram).

Please feel free to contact us at the mailto:support@paasmer.co for any information or customization.

Smart-Transportation-Paasmer-IoT-Platform

Smart Transportation and IoT

ManagementTeamMouli1

Srinidhi Murthy

Thanks to laptops and smartphones, human beings are able to stay connected to the Internet more often that ever before, but yet there are still some notable dead spots, particularly in cars, buses, and trains. Anyone with a daily commute can speak to lapses in coverage on the subway or when going through a tunnel.

But the Internet of Things is looking to change all that and keep people connected at every moment of every day. Connected cars, buses, trains, and even planes will allow people to have a stable Internet connection at almost all times.

And the transformation won’t stop there, as the IoT will make transportation itself more efficient and help us get from place to place more quickly.

A new term called as “Internet of Transportation” has been coined and it will create the new era of connected transportation and change how we travel.

With Internet of Transportation assets we can:

  • Reduce congestion by monitoring and controlling traffic lights.
  • Send alerts to drivers and emergency responders on trip conditions, then offer alternative routes.
  • Reduce fuel consumption and vehicle emissions.
  • Provide smart parking solutions that identify and communicate available spaces.
  • Improve safety for motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists.
  • Identify structural issues of bridges, roadways, and tunnels.
  • Provide smart lighting and security monitoring for city streets.

Let’s look at some of the use cases of Smart Transportation and how they are implemented.

Fleet Management:
Fleet telematics solutions help businesses, transportation carriers, and governments improve economics, safety, and compliance by intelligently monitoring and controlling their vehicles.

Specific or Generic Smart Applications gather and analyze data from on-board instrumentation and GPS sensors to track vehicle status and location, optimize routing, and monitor driver and equipment performance and productivity.

Connected Cars:

Smart-Transportation-1-Paasmer
In the last few years, connected cars or smart cars have surged in popularity thanks to the IoT. Today, car companies are connecting their vehicles in two manners: embedded and tethered. Embedded cars employ a built-in antenna and chipset, while tethered connections make use of hardware to let drivers connect to their cars through their smartphones.

On top of this, app integration is becoming more and more standard in the car of today. Google Maps and other navigation systems have started to replace built-in GPS systems in dashboards.

Apps such as GasBuddy show the driver where he or she can locate the cheapest fuel in their area. And music apps such as Spotify have started to away the need for traditional and satellite radio.

Transport Logistics:

Smart-Transportation-2-Paasmer

Intelligent transport logistics solutions help long-haul cargo operators and last-mile delivery providers efficiently manage the transportation and distribution of freight and merchandise.

Smart applications gather and analyze data from onboard sensors to track containers and packages, and to monitor environmental conditions, ensuring goods arrive on time, at the right place, intact.

Traffic and Parking Management:

Smart-Transportation-3-min

Smart-Transportation-Paasmer

Integrated Traffic and Parking Management Systems can reduce congestion and save fuel in Business Districts and City Centers. Sensors built into Parking Meters can indicate to a server when a parking slot becomes available. A car User with a Smart Phone App can request to find a parking space within a designated radius based on the GPS location and the server responds with the available parking spaces. This saves fuel and congestion caused by Simply using visual parking search methods.

Traffic Management systems can use sensors, cameras, to find out intersection that has become congested and Use smart algorithms to determine which direction the traffic needs to be moving too quickly clear congestion. It can also act as an Emergency response systems in case of accidents or emergencies.

PAASMER:
Paasmer is an IoT Platform As A Service which can connect any of your IoT devices to the the Paasmer Platform allow for control, visualization and Analytics of Data that are received from the Sensors.

What can PAASMER do for Smart Transportation:
PAASMER is a flexible, economical and easy way to connect your IoT devices and it works on a various range of Hardware devices that are available off the shelf. Using Paasmer Building POC for Smart Transportation would be most reliable, fast and economical. Please do visit us at paasmer.co for more details.

iot2

Naturalizing IOT through standardization

ManagementTeamMouli1

Kavitha Gopalan

Internet of Things is one of fast growing technology in the recent years. It’s expected that the growth of connected things will be around 50 billion by 2020. Every industry vertical has signed itself into embracing IOT either to create cutting edge products or for optimizing the resource and improve efficiency. As IOT growth explodes there are few challenges that are becoming key road blocks for a wider adoption of IOT. The two of the challenges that stands out are the security and Standardization.

Like any new growing technology, standardization is important for IOT. Standardization will allow devices to interoperable in IOT and allow seamless integration between various verticals. Several attempts have been made to standardize IOT, new alliances and consortiums have been formed but there is yet no single winner though many have shown promises for becoming one.

Why is standardizing IOT difficult?

The main reason for the complexity of IOT standardization is the fragmented nature of its adoption base. IOT is a global phenomenon and it has expanded its roots to all sectors of life- Factories, Healthcare, transportation, utilities, home. The standards and protocol used for one vertical may not scale well for the other. For example, a smart home device may be managed with the wireless protocol such as Zigbee or WiFi. But when IOT is used for an M2M application Zigbee or WiFi may not be the right approach we need to look at cellular communication protocols.

Similarly, each layer of the IOT architecture could vary depending on which industry its used for. The way an industrial application handles data may be different from the way the home device handles it. So arriving at the common standard which is agreeable to all has been difficult.

Differences in IOT spring from each layer of the architecture. Each vendor/manufacturer use the approach which easily adaptable to their industry segment.

Where are we now?

Z-wave and Zigbee were the top standards used by several smart home manufacturers in the beginning. But they could not establish themselves as the defacto standard for IOT. Then we had many more communication protocols that emerged as the one that could serve the needs of IOT, there are around 12+ protocols now available for IOT, Bluetooth, Zigbee, Zwave, EnOcean, NFC, WiFI, LPWAN, NB-IOT, weightless, LoRA, LTE, Cellular being some of them.

The differences are just not in the communication layer.Different standards are available for data transport in IOT – MQTT, CoAP, REST, SOAP, Websocket.

Many consortium and alliance have been formed to standardize IOT. Some of the as listed below

  • The Open Interconnect Consortium has come out with their IOTvity standards
  • AllSeen Alliance has their ALLJoyn standard.
  • THread group has the thread standard.
  • ZigBee Alliance has their Zigbee standard.
  • Z Wave alliance.
  • Industrial Internet Consortium.

The goal of these consortiums is to find a common ground /standard that every vendor manufacturer can follow while implementing IOT. But unfortunately they haven’t been able to agree on the terms But currently, no one has emerged as the leader in setting the standards. Disagreement in standards, licensing has been the reason for no clear winner. Which standard will emerge as a leader will be based on which is easily adaptable by manufacturers.

Right now every vendor puts together the pieces that works best for their application without much thought on the standards. But if IOT has to mature a common standard must emerge which would allow Interoperability of various devices and can scale to different industry verticals seamlessly. Whether this is possible or not depends on how much collaboration happens between this different consortium.

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A Guideline to CIOs for their IoT Deployments to be Successful

ManagementTeamMouli1

Chandramouli Srinivasan

The proliferation of the Internet of Things will drive widespread adoption of IoT solutions, including IoT platforms. IT leaders and directors of application infrastructure need to understand the capabilities, scope, and relationship of IoT platforms to existing IT infrastructure.

Key Challenges:

  • New IoT business solutions are composed of a complex, heterogeneous mix of IoT endpoints and platforms, and back-end systems and data.
  • IoT platforms typically offer many functionality capabilities, which vary (as do related marketing claims) from provider to provider, and IoT project requirements vary widely, making it difficult for enterprises and service providers to understand, compare and choose products.
  • IoT platforms are often bundled with specific renderings of IoT capabilities (for example, analytics) to solve specific business problems (such as predictive maintenance), but these typically, must be configured or customized to suit, and, at times, these capabilities augment and overlap (or look like) similar capabilities elsewhere in your application infrastructure.
  • Many business units are implementing use cases that include embedded Internet of Things (IoT) solutions. CIOs need to step up to provide leadership that can unleash and capture IoT benefits at the enterprise level.
  • The interplay between the four core capabilities of IoT — sense, communicate, analyze and act – makes it very different from traditional IT. This lack of familiarity makes planning difficult.
  • Confusion about the relationship between IoT, operational technology and digital business makes it a challenge to position IoT correctly within the organization.
  • The complexity and novelty of Internet of Things (IoT) solutions create challenges with controlling scope.
  • The market and technology for IoT are volatile and dynamic, increasing the risk that planned deployments can become obsolete by the time they launch.
  • Procurement options for IoT are evolving and include tying into third-party endpoints and IoT systems. In addition, emerging IoT ecosystems are forming around standards, and leading industrial and consumer brands are extending into IoT.
  • There is a high risk of IoT project failure due to technology complexity; limited internal skills; knowledge, cultural and organizational barriers; and difficulties realizing planned benefits.

Recommendations:

  • Use IoT Solution Scope Reference Model to help identify the key IoT solutions components and understand their roles, importance, and relationship to each other and existing infrastructure.
  • Commission an IoT center of excellence role to explore the potential business value of IoT solutions and their potential impact on existing IT infrastructure.
  • Plan a phased approach, to fully realize IoT project potential. Focus initially on IoT platform deployment and, over time, integrate the platform with back-end systems, data, and analytics.
  • Identify the core benefits of IoT that are most relevant to your organization. We define the eight core IoT benefits as improving operations, optimizing assets, enhancing services, generating revenues, increasing engagement, improving well-being, strengthening security and conserving resources. Link these benefits to high-level business objectives to set the strategic context for IoT.
  • Form cross-functional teams of business and technology leaders to brainstorm future business moment scenarios and the role that IoT can play. Then work collaboratively to prioritize those that warrant further development.
  • Plan how your organization can leverage the four capabilities of IoT (sense, communicate, analyze and act) in support of business moment scenarios.
  • Control the scope of early IoT use cases by reducing technology complexity, limiting the number of endpoints, and cutting down or eliminating complex integration with enterprise systems.
  • Monitor IoT market developments on an ongoing basis. Identify opportunities to substitute customized IoT components and related software with commodity mass-market components.
  • Pursue opportunities to tie into third-party IoT and emerging IoT ecosystems first, before engaging in the custom development of IoT solutions.
  • Conduct one or more IoT pilot projects before going into a production deployment. Be prepared to iterate through multiple pilots, which will reduce risk by applying lessons learned.
securing_iot_devices-through_paasmer

Securing IoT Devices through PAASMER

ManagementTeamMouli1

Kavitha Gopalan

The recent DDoS attack using connected devices was massive and disruptive, to say the least. The attack which was done using the internet enabled Cameras affected lot of websites Twitter, Amazon, Reddit, Netflix, and more. The attack specifically targeted the DNS (Domain Name System) that maps human readable website address to their IP address.

In this attack, the malicious malware named Mirai was infected to the smart home devices like connected cameras that were vulnerable. Mirai spreads itself by scanning the Internet for IPs owned by commonly connected devices. These devices are often left with factory logins passwords and weak security protocols. The software uses this weakness to upload itself onto the device and take it over. Once the device is infected it will act like a botnet and sends spurious traffic to website swamping them that the website won’t be able to handle the load that it could break down. Cyber-attacks are not new but a smart device that have an IP address and that are not properly secured are vulnerable and could open the gate for more serious and dangerous attack.

IoT is influencing our lives in numerous ways by bringing a lot of value. But at the same time, IoT involves connecting the devices to Internet. Any connected objects like cars and home appliances are vulnerable. On one hand the enormous amount of data from the smart devices need to be secure and safe and should not fall into the wrong hands and on the other hand, the smart devices acting like botnets to create the DDOS type of attack.

Therefore, building secure IoT products and solution are a top priority and IoT product manufacturer, software vendors and platform vendors all have the task at hand to build a system which is secure and can prevent these kinds of attack.

Solving the Security Threat Using PAASMER platform
As a secure IoT platform, PAASMER’s goal has been to ensure that IoT service/products built using the platform is highly secure.

PAASMER Security framework follows a ground-up implementation to ensure data from the device to cloud and beyond is secure and no data compromise happens during. It also ensures that the devices are not exposed to any kind of attack.

PAASMER Security framework and how data safety is ensured is defined as below.

Device Level security
Device-level security in PAASMER ensures the edge devices and gateways are not vulnerable and they do not expose their IP address to other devices which are not authorized for the access. This prevents any type of attack on them.
PAASMER Device-level security is implemented in MISTY Operating system/Firmware package for IoT devices. The key features include

  1. Secure Boot
  2. Secure Provisioning
  3. Secure updates and patches

The secure boot validates and authenticates the software in the device each time the device powers up through a digital signature. This ensures no unknown software or malware is running on the device. An additional hardware chip called TPM provides enhanced security.

Secure provisioning uses secure tokens to establish the device into the network. Once the devices communicate its presence a secure token is released for the device to communicate with the gateway.

The IoT devices also need regular software updates and patches to keep them safe from malicious virus and attacks. However, what usually happens is once these devices are installed it’s forgotten. That’s why PAASMER offers Over the air software updates and patches which ensure the user does not need to bother about doing a regular software update. It’s automatically updated when a new patch is available after a secure device authentication.

Access Control, Authentication, and Authorization
Access Control is built into the operating system to ensure that only authorized users are accessing the device. User level policy, Device level policy limits the access to users/device to the function they must perform. Multi-layered authentication like username/password, passcode based authentication, strong password rule and policy based access is defined at the device layer. PAASMER security framework forces customers to rest password during the initial registration process forcing them to change the factory password and also implements stringent rules for passwords.

Device authentication allows each device to validate itself when they enter the network thus removing device trying to sneak the network.

Data Encryption
PAASMER also provides end to end Data encryption. All the data service from the device to the gateway to cloud to applications are encrypted so no data theft is possible while the data is moving.

PAASMER Security Framework leverages the SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 standards to leverage the latest in session and security frameworks to ensure security for the data. All communications require valid certificates that are authenticated every time a client connects.

PAASMER also ensures the data itself is encrypted with the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) encryption specification.

Secure Communication
PAASMER mandates the usage of secure network tunnel for device communication with the cloud. The choice of network tunnel can vary between each use case. Handling all device communications over the secure network tunnel ensures that there is no network spoofing of device data or controls. Special Ant-DDoS choices on network tunnel ensure protection against the DDoS attacks.

Conclusion
To reap the full potential of IoT the security challenges faced by IoT devices should be mitigated. While the onus of Securing IoT devices lies with the platform vendors, software vendors, product manufacturers and consumers alike, vendors need to harden security in each of their offerings by the following end to end security implementation. By using PAASMER platform, IoT manufacturers can leverage the inbuilt security elements to build a Secure IoT platform in a quick, efficient way.

iot_basics

IoT Basic Definitions and States

ManagementTeamMouli1

Chandramouli Srinivasan

There is much variation in understanding of the Internet of Things and its related concepts — operational technology and machine-to-machine communication.The concept of the Internet of Things (IoT) is not fundamentally new, but several factors are converging to drive extremely high levels of deployment. Mass adoption is shifting the IoT into a powerful force for business transformation.

  • The IoT is the network of dedicated physical objects (things) that contain embedded technology to sense or interact with their internal state or external environment. The IoT comprises an ecosystem that includes things, communication, applications and data analysis.
  • Machine-to-machine (M2M) communication services refer to connectivity services that link IoT “things” to central or back-end systems, without human input.
  • Operational technology (OT) is enterprise technology used to monitor and/or control physical devices, assets and processes.

Why Now for the IoT?
The concept of the IoT is not fundamentally new. Connected “things” have provided benefits to enterprises and consumers for years. Examples include automated teller machines (ATMs), airline check-in machines and card-operated door locks. Back-end systems have provided much value in these situations by analyzing usage patterns, enhancing maintenance support and interfacing with enterprise software. However, the IoT is evolving beyond these early examples as increasing penetration and greater numbers of use cases lead to the much greater utility.

Several diverse factors are converging to drive further value and use from the IoT:

  • Business models that take advantage of the IoT are emerging — such as pay-as-you-drive insurance offerings, smart waste bins on city streets and remote healthcare services. These models are seen as proof that the IoT will solve real business problems, and they spur enterprises to explore new ways in which to use the IoT.
  • The costs of connectivity and of embedded technology have fallen to a point where this is no longer a barrier to adoption. Costs are now low enough for most situations and are continuing to fall. Broadband is now well penetrated to allow much of this connectivity.
  • Mobile app development platforms have matured, allowing OT devices such as programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to be controlled and monitored remotely from a tablet computer. APIs are being added to industrial and other OT software in order to support this change.
  • The power of big data and analytics is being applied to the data originating from things. This supports decision making in a wide range of contexts and is probably the largest value component of the IoT.
  • New applications are rapidly emerging that focus on the control and monitoring of physical entities. These are extremely diverse and include inventory control, remote healthcare, livestock control, home energy management, agricultural crop sensing, and many more examples.
  • IoT hosting platforms are available from a growing list of suppliers. These cloud-based facilities can scale to very large numbers of users and things. They integrate and link with application and middleware while providing some degree of security. These platforms offer a quick and easy basis on which to develop IoT solutions.
  • Standards and ecosystems are starting to form. These will stabilize over the next several years, facilitating rapid development of solutions across a range of industries.
  • Distributed DBMS styles such as NoSQL and higher performance in-memory computing are available to support real-time analytics.
  • Regulation and legislation are pushing some categories of things into the mainstream. Examples include smart meters and many automotive functions. Intelligent lighting will follow as governments encourage energy savings through light-emitting diode (LED) technology. The infrastructure required for these use cases will support further examples and will, therefore boost overall growth of the IoT.

IoT Today offers Limited Value

  • Few use cases
  • Fragmented solutions
  • Unclear ownership of the IoT in enterprises

IoT Tomorrow will offer Transformation Value

  • Mass adoption
  • Tens of billions of things connected
  • Multi-trillion-dollar economic value from the IoT

Future IoT will be driven by these Key Drivers

  • New business models that take advantage of the IoT
  • Falling costs of connectivity and technology
  • Mobile app development platforms
  • Analytics applied to things
  • New applications
  • IoT hosting platforms
  • Standards and ecosystems
  • Distributed and real-time architectures
  • Regulation
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Weekly Digest on Internet of Things

ManagementTeamMouli1

Kavitha Gopalan

Blockchain-based IoT project does drone deliveries using Ethereum
Chronicled, a San Francisco-based technology company that is currently developing a blockchain-hosted registry and protocol for the Internet of Things (IoT), has unveiled a prototype drone delivery system using Ethereum.

A video shows a drone equipped with a secure blockchain-registered BLE identity chip which is able to self-authenticate with a computer-controlled window and gain access to a private residence in order to deliver a package.
Find out more on this post from IBtimes

Autonomous boats: self-driving in Amsterdam
Amsterdam: a quaint city overflowing with charm. After a recent visit, I fulfilled all of my dreams: riding bikes, visiting the Anne Frank house, and eating endless waffles. At the point when I had to slow down, I sat and watched the boats filled with locals and tourists roll by, and the question came to mind: What if the boats were self-driving?

MIT is joining forces with the city of Amsterdam to bring the world’s first fleet of autonomous boats. Over the next five years, they hope for these boats to become commonplace within the city’s canals, used for the transportation of people and resources as well as keeping track of the environment.
Find out more on this post from IBM

How IoT logistics will revolutionize supply chain management
OThe combination of mobile computing, analytics, and cloud services, all of which are fueled by the Internet of Things (IoT), is changing how delivery and fulfillment companies are conducting their operations.

One of the most popular methods for fulfilling deliveries today is through third-party logistics, which involves any company that provides outsourced services to move products and resources from one area to another.

But the IoT is going to change how this process operates.
Find out more on this post fromYahoo Finance

Repurposed sensor enables smartwatch to detect finger taps and other bio-acoustic signals
A smartwatch is capable of detecting and distinguishing a variety of taps, flicks and scratches by the hands and fingers, and all that’s required is a software upgrade that repurposes the device’s existing accelerometer, Carnegie Mellon University researchers discovered.

This new functionality makes possible new applications that use common gestures to control the smartwatch and, ultimately, other objects connected through the internet of things. By monitoring vibrations that occur when people hold objects or use tools, the smartwatch also would be capable of recognizing objects and activities.
Find out more on this post from Phys.org

The answer to Internet of Things madness? Open source, of course!
The IoT market is so diverse, with every product seemingly requiring its own app (and sometimes its own hub), that it has actually started to hold the market back. What’s worse is that consumers’ number one concern – security – suffers. Most products use and store your home Wi-Fi as a way of communicating, but sloppy security has repeatedly made those authentication details accessible, opening up your entire home’s system to attack.
Find out more on this post from Theregister.co.uk

internet-of-things

Weekly Digest on Internet of Things

ManagementTeamMouli1

Kavitha Gopalan

Calm, cruel and connected: August’s best and worst of IoT
Regular travelers know the pain of lugging around a wheelie suitcase. It can not only leave you with a stiff shoulder or wrenched arm but also the pain of longing for a hands free experience. Enter a robotic suitcase that utilizes a camera sensor and Bluetooth to follow its owner on their journey. The Cowarobot moves at a speed of 4.5 mph and is equipped for 12.5 miles of walking before needing a charge. It comes with a keyless locking function, can charge your devices and is equipped to dodge obstacles in its path.

This blog covers more of the new IOT products that will blow your mind
Find out more on this post fromForbes

Why a smart contact lens is the ultimate wearable
Smart contact lenses sound like science fiction. But there’s already a race to develop technology for the contact lenses of the future — ones that will give you super-human vision and will offer heads-up displays, video cameras, medical sensors and much more. In fact, these products are already being developed.

Sounds unreal, right? But it turns out that eyeballs are the perfect place to put technology.
Find out more on this post fromComputerworld

Connected barrels: Transforming oil and gas strategies with the Internet of Things
O&G companies can reap considerable value by developing an integrated IoT strategy with an aim to transform the business. It has been estimated that only 1 percent of the information gathered is being made available to O&G decision makers. Increased data capture and analysis can likely save millions of dollars by eliminating as many as half of a company’s unplanned well outages and boosting crude output by as much as 10 percent over a two-year period.In fact, IoT applications in O&G can literally influence global GDP. Industry-wide adoption of IoT technology could increase global GDP by as much as 0.8 percent, or $816 billion during the next decade, according to Oxford Economics.
Find out more on this post fromDupressDeloitte

How automation is transforming the way we do business, and what it means for you
The explosion of the Internet of Things (IoT) has added a level of complexity to IT and Marketing disciplines, providing new use cases to an already extensive array of devices and applications. Engaging customers at different stages of their marketing journey requires creating personalized messaging, scenario-specific experiences and multi-channel campaigns.
Find out more on this post from Geekwire

Smart dog collars could be the next big thing in wearables
The wearables industry has been primarily focused on building devices for humans, but that could change in the next few years, if the excitement over dog wearables with the Link AKC is any indicator.

The smart collar, designed in collaboration with the American Kennel Club (AKC), comes packed with features you would find on a normal human wearable, including a fitness tracker and step count.
Find out more on this post from ReadWrite

What you need to know about the imminent threat of IoT botnets
What do security analyst Brian Krebs, French hosting giant OVH and famous gaming company Blizzard have in common? They’ve all been the recent victims of massive Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, assaults that involve disabling online services by suffocating them with automated requests. Krebs’ blog was brought down by an unprecedented 620 Gbps flood, OVH suffered a 1.1 Tbps traffic, and Blizzard’s Battle.net service went offline after a sizeable DDoS hit its servers.While DDoS is nothing new, attacks of this magnitude are, and what’s making them possible are IoT botnets, armies of compromised Internet of Things devices doing the bidding of malicious actors. This means that any connected devices from CCTV cameras installed in streets to a harmless coffee machine sitting in your home can be secretly involved in attacking websites and servers
Find out more on this post fromVentureBeat

power-of-iot-edge3

Unleashing the Power of IoT Edge

ManagementTeamMouli1

Chandramouli Srinivasan

Enterprises are increasingly connecting a broad variety and number of IoT endpoints (a collection of sensors) to access data from and better manage physical assets that are relevant to their business. Typical IoT-enabled business objectives include traditional benefits, such as improved asset management, as well as new business opportunities and revenue models, such as subscribed-to services. Integrated IoT platforms are required due to the increasing sophistication, scale and business value of these data exchanges.

An IoT platform is an on-premises software suite or a cloud service (IoT platform as a service[PaaS]) that monitors and may manage and control various types of endpoints, often via applications business units deploy on the platform. The IoT platform generally incorporates operations involving IoT endpoints (sensors, devices, and multidevice systems), IoT gateways, and back-end enterprise applications and data. The platform provides the capability to monitor IoT event streams, enables specialized analysis and application development, and engages back-end IT systems or services. It typically plays a vital role in providing functionality for provisioning, controlling and even changing the endpoints to support IoT solutions. Any IoT solution contains two parts an IoT Edge (includes endpoints and gateways) and an IoT Cloud (includes Cloud, Analytics, and Visualizations).

General IoT Platform capabilities include:

  • Provisioning and management of devices
  • Data aggregation, integration, transformation, storage, and management
  • Device Event processing: Policy and Rules Management
  • Cybersecurity
  • IoT device communications (network and/or the Internet)
  • Adapter or Connectors (API hub, gateway software)
  • Customizing and building applications (SDK, IDE etc.)
  • IoT data analysis and visualization including machine learning
  • User interfaces for both end users and developers

MostIoT Platforms offer many of these capabilities in the cloud and allow edge devices like sensors and gateway to connect to their cloud and leverage these capabilities.

The IoT platform may be implemented by the enterprise as an on-premises solution, using an IoT PaaS in the cloud, or be distributed between any combination of on-premises IoT endpoint agents, the gateway, public cloud IoT PaaS, and back-end systems and data.Very few Edge focused IoT platforms like Fog-Horn and PAASMER provide many of these capabilities on the Edge of IoT. Offering these capabilities at the Edge means all the data from the sensors can be processed at the IoT Edge. This plays a critical role in providing a more real-time response to events and to lower the cost of maintaining an IoT solution.

MISTY is PAASMER IoT Edge software that bundles all the key elements required to power the edge to be truly intelligent than act as data transfer agents. Unique aspects of MISTY are:

    1. Modular Operating System.
    2. High Speed Edge Database.
    3. Real-Time Rules Engine.
    4. Edge Analytics.
    5. Edge Machine Learning Engine.
    6. Hyper-Scale Cloud Connectors.
    7. Patented Security Engine.

IoT platform software is an emerging market with many types of buyers across the enterprise, from central IT to various lines of business (or LOBs). These buyers have different objectives, project types and success criteria. IoT platform software’s rapid evolution is driven by enterprises’ technical and business requirements, which continue to rapidly evolve and vary by industry and region, and emerging standards.

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Weekly Digest on Internet of Things

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Kavitha Gopalan

How The Internet Of Things Makes Dumb Devices Smart
The real business potential to add value through IoT doesn’t lie in the sensors or the networks that connect them. It exists in the potential of real time big data analytics to transform business operations and improve our lives. Big data analytics and machine learning will deliver personal and business insights and will enable us to make immediate decisions based on that data – rather than relying as we have in the past, on guesswork or out-of-date forecasts.
Find out more on this post fromForbes

Cisco, Salesforce partner on Internet of Things
Cisco and Salesforce are partnering to align collaboration, Internet of Things, and contact center technologies. Specifically, the two companies will jointly develop and market products that combine Cisco’s Spark and WebEx into Salesforce’s Sales and Service Clouds. The integration will integrate chat,video and voice features. More importantly, Cisco’s Jasper IoT platform will integrate with Salesforce’s IoT cloud. The combination should give Salesforce’s Einstein artificial intelligence platform more data and visibility.
Find out more on this post from ZDNet

IoT Success: Sharing Data, Analytics Fuels Growth
The issues of IoT data and what to do with it is the focus on a recent report from the MIT Sloan Management Review titled, “Data Sharing and Analytics Drive Success With IoT.” The key to using IoT data, whether it’s internal or shared with the outside world, is having good analytics capabilities. However, this is where the supply of knowledgeable technology talent becomes critical.

Our survey found the two most common challenges for deriving value from IoT were in the area of data analytics, specifically handling and analyzing the resulting data from IoT devices. The next most common challenge was the need to increase their IoT talent base. These capabilities aren’t yet widespread; this year’s MIT Sloan Management Review analytics report classifies 49% of organizations as analytically challenged.
Find out more on this post from Informationweek

Why Intel Is Betting High On The IoT Market
As Intel’s PC sales have slowed, it has increased its focus on the IoT segment, which is considered to be the next big driver for the semiconductor industry. IoT accounts for less than 5% of Intel’s revenue at present, though we forecast the revenue contribution will almost double over the next five years. This scenario is quite likely considering that the company has been significantly expanding its IoT portfolio through acquisitions.
Find out more on this post from Forbes

Largest DDoS attack ever delivered by botnet of hijacked IoT devices
A giant botnet made up of hijacked internet-connected things like cameras, lightbulbs, and thermostats has launched the largest DDoS attack ever against a top security blogger, an attack so big Akamai had to cancel his account because defending it ate up too many resources.An IoT botnet generating this much traffic is a bellwether event that Ellis says will take some time to analyze to come up with more efficient mitigation tools.
Find out more on this post from NetworkWorld

Which vendors are winning the fight for Internet of Things supremacy?
As outlined in Technology Business Research findings, commercial IoT ecosystem revenue grew 18.3 per cent year-to-year in 2Q16, with cloud services remaining the industry’s fastest-growing segment year-to-year at 67.2 per cent due to vendors’ evolving need for platforms, processing and storage.

According to research, vendors with incumbencies in IT and consulting are the leaders, with IBM, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Cisco and Microsoft emerging as the top four
Find out more on this post from ARNNET

Complementary Technologies Enabling Effective IoT Solutions.
These IoT based deployments / solutions can be realized using variety of technologies. Every technology comes with its own unique advantages, but it is important to note that each of them also has some disadvantages. The solution deployments are highly effective when complementary technologies are used together.
Find out more on this post from PAASMER