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Weekly Digest on Internet of Things

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Kavitha Gopalan

Blockchain-based IoT project does drone deliveries using Ethereum
Chronicled, a San Francisco-based technology company that is currently developing a blockchain-hosted registry and protocol for the Internet of Things (IoT), has unveiled a prototype drone delivery system using Ethereum.

A video shows a drone equipped with a secure blockchain-registered BLE identity chip which is able to self-authenticate with a computer-controlled window and gain access to a private residence in order to deliver a package.
Find out more on this post from IBtimes

Autonomous boats: self-driving in Amsterdam
Amsterdam: a quaint city overflowing with charm. After a recent visit, I fulfilled all of my dreams: riding bikes, visiting the Anne Frank house, and eating endless waffles. At the point when I had to slow down, I sat and watched the boats filled with locals and tourists roll by, and the question came to mind: What if the boats were self-driving?

MIT is joining forces with the city of Amsterdam to bring the world’s first fleet of autonomous boats. Over the next five years, they hope for these boats to become commonplace within the city’s canals, used for the transportation of people and resources as well as keeping track of the environment.
Find out more on this post from IBM

How IoT logistics will revolutionize supply chain management
OThe combination of mobile computing, analytics, and cloud services, all of which are fueled by the Internet of Things (IoT), is changing how delivery and fulfillment companies are conducting their operations.

One of the most popular methods for fulfilling deliveries today is through third-party logistics, which involves any company that provides outsourced services to move products and resources from one area to another.

But the IoT is going to change how this process operates.
Find out more on this post fromYahoo Finance

Repurposed sensor enables smartwatch to detect finger taps and other bio-acoustic signals
A smartwatch is capable of detecting and distinguishing a variety of taps, flicks and scratches by the hands and fingers, and all that’s required is a software upgrade that repurposes the device’s existing accelerometer, Carnegie Mellon University researchers discovered.

This new functionality makes possible new applications that use common gestures to control the smartwatch and, ultimately, other objects connected through the internet of things. By monitoring vibrations that occur when people hold objects or use tools, the smartwatch also would be capable of recognizing objects and activities.
Find out more on this post from Phys.org

The answer to Internet of Things madness? Open source, of course!
The IoT market is so diverse, with every product seemingly requiring its own app (and sometimes its own hub), that it has actually started to hold the market back. What’s worse is that consumers’ number one concern – security – suffers. Most products use and store your home Wi-Fi as a way of communicating, but sloppy security has repeatedly made those authentication details accessible, opening up your entire home’s system to attack.
Find out more on this post from Theregister.co.uk

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